Catch Fall Bass By Looking Shallow – Really Shallow

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Here’s an insider sort of bass tip that drove me to a cool fall get that you can reproduce. I was making a beeline for the eminent Tennessee River impoundment known as Kentucky Lake for a photograph shoot and nearby expert Terry Bolton let me know he’d been angling the backs of pockets and getting bass “in mud.”

The fall drawdown, which decreases lake levels to winter pool, channels backwaters and leaves baitfish dimpling in thin profundities as they eat green growth from any hard structure that remaining parts submerged. Shortening days and cooling evenings squeeze all fish to eat generously this season of the year, so Bolton prompted me to search for those shallow draw schools and toss lipless crankbaits to emulate the rummage.

Beyond any doubt enough, on a photograph session with Bassmaster master Keith Combs, we saw a decent one busting snare so shallow his back was breaking water. Brushes couldn’t push any shallower, so I hurled a 1/4-ounce Strike King Redeye Shad to the extent I could. The snare sprinkled down 10 feet from the bubble, yet the ravenous bass promptly dashed over and ate my lipless wrench.

A few takeaways here:

  • Try not to discount the apparently emptied territories, especially out of late morning until nightfall when the shallow water has achieved greatest warmth. As baitfish movement builds, so does bass intrigue.
  • Keep a determination of response draws convenient to cover bunches of water and rapidly hit focuses of chance — like encouraging bass.
  • Ultimately, stay away stop. Shaking vessels send obvious weight wakes toward fish that are as of now anxious about their defenseless profundity, so don’t give them any more reason for caution.

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